BOOM FESTIVAL 2016 Photos

 BOOM FESTIVAL 2016 Photos

Photo Journey Portugal

Photo Journey Portugal


https://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=zFX6Yc1rlk8

https://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=zFX6Yc1rlk8


A while back I took a trip with one of my friends, who is a graffiti artist to Staten Island. This by far was one of the most secluded spots I have been to in a while. It's part of NYC that most people would never even think it existed. Staten Island who? or where? Yes it's one of NYC boroughs and it surely has many hidden urban treasures. Graffiti? Who does it anyway. Walk around Williamsburg or east of Williamsburg and you will definitely come across an art piece that most of us would call graffiti. But I have a slight different understanding what graffiti is.

I think there is a difference between graffiti and wall murals that we call graffiti. All the pieces that are shown on the images below say something different then the painted murals in Williamsburg or other parts of NYC like East Village. The intention and motives I feel are a bit different. I don't think the graffiti that I took pics of on Staten Island was commissioned, nor even allowed vs some of the murals with positive messages or PR. These artist who tag the walls simply say one thing. "I was here" Like a dog marking their territory! With style they recognize and give props to one another. My friend seems to notice all the tags in and around NYC. Things that I am totally oblivious to. But he know's, like a dog knows his kind, he knows.

Take a peek at what I would say is the real graffiti in NYC.


DSC00239.jpg

A while back I took a trip with one of my friends, who is a graffiti artist to Staten Island. This by far was one of the most secluded spots I have been to in a while. It's part of NYC that most people would never even think it existed. Staten Island who? or where? Yes it's one of NYC boroughs and it surely has many hidden urban treasures. Graffiti? Who does it anyway. Walk around Williamsburg or east of Williamsburg and you will definitely come across an art piece that most of us would call graffiti. But I have a slight different understanding what graffiti is.

I think there is a difference between graffiti and wall murals that we call graffiti. All the pieces that are shown on the images below say something different then the painted murals in Williamsburg or other parts of NYC like East Village. The intention and motives I feel are a bit different. I don't think the graffiti that I took pics of on Staten Island was commissioned, nor even allowed vs some of the murals with positive messages or PR. These artist who tag the walls simply say one thing. "I was here" Like a dog marking their territory! With style they recognize and give props to one another. My friend seems to notice all the tags in and around NYC. Things that I am totally oblivious to. But he know's, like a dog knows his kind, he knows.

Take a peek at what I would say is the real graffiti in NYC.


DSC00239.jpg

Way back when.. a bit of time passed since then,. BUT a classic time with classy people. When the trio bond (Take-it, E-zy, A-gain) unpredicted things were formed.

Featuring vocalist and piano Tatyana Shemberova,  silent guitarist Izabela Kobylarz and our couch-surfing host in Fes.

Filmed by Aga,
Edited by Tatyana Shemberova

Way back when.. a bit of time passed since then,. BUT a classic time with classy people. When the trio bond (Take-it, E-zy, A-gain) unpredicted things were formed.

Featuring vocalist and piano Tatyana Shemberova,  silent guitarist Izabela Kobylarz and our couch-surfing host in Fes.

Filmed by Aga,
Edited by Tatyana Shemberova



Cycling the Ring of Kerry took less preparation than I had imagined. 180 kilometers seemed to be an unfathomably long bike ride that made my daily trips to school or Tesco pail in comparison. I had packed all the dates, bananas, and cashews that could fit inside my backpack to safeguard against what I feared was immanent starvation and exhaustion. Next, I was lent top-notch gear, including an ultra lightweight carbon fiber Trek bike, clip-in shoes, and shirts from a friend who is a real-life iron woman. (http://www.irishtriathlon.com/index.php/2014/07/tamara-maxantovas-kona-qualification-report-from-ironman-austria/) Then I found myself trolling on YouTube and stumbled along this gem on how to wear bike shorts (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hOcNoYchlI&feature=youtu.be). And so, Iza and I followed the wise words and went without knickers across 217.11 km of stunning scenery.

                                                             Gap of Danloe. Ring of Kerry.

Traveling is easy. And that’s something I should have reminded myself. There are always well-worn paths to follow and friendly locals to point you in the right direction. There are also always people who will stop to give you a lift. For instance, we sustained a bicycle injury (a broken chain) and despite the most heroic efforts to resuscitate it, we needed heavy-duty tools. And here entered a middle-aged English couple from the midlands who provided a lift to the nearest bike shop.

The challenging physical test I had hoped to meet ended up being pleasantly manageable. Perhaps the daily cycling and regular swimming, sport activities, and gym attendance helped? We easily covered around 70 kilometers each day, burning in total 5,641 calories each.

One of the most pleasant experiences of the trip was feeling that we were temporarily lifted out from Ireland. The weather was warm. The sun bronzed our skin (after burning mine first). We came across soft sand and beaches with turquoise water. Palm trees dotted the landscape along with colorful wildflowers that broke through the lush green. Magenta dangling bells, crimson and pink pendants, white fluffy saucers and yellow star-like petals that formed a wand. And of course, countryside hydrangeas of the most cheerful varieties.

Cycling from Killarney to Kenmare our first evening, we passed Ladies View and the National Forest as the summer sun was beginning to fall and a mist hovered among the rhododendrons that had just past their bloom. The goodnight song of the birds and fresh dewy forest air was revitalizing.


Day 1. Killerney-Kenmare.


Day 2. Kenmare - Ballinskellings.



Day 3. Ballinskellings-Glenbeigh.



Day 4. Glenbeigh-Killarney.


What would make cycling though the Ring of Kerry a 10 out of 10? Experiencing a well developed culinary tradition, bigger than a just your meal in a glass. We did have a pleasant dining experience at Rumours Café near Rossbeigh which served up muscles and lamb and Murphy’s salted ice cream in Killarney where we indulged in Dingle-gin and strawberry pleasures. But what about cycling though Champagne or Tuscany? This is all food for thought.

I will now travel by bike whenever possible, and hopefully, again with Iza. She makes for an incredible travel companion! Her tales of traveling across 7 continents kept me captivated and have inspired me to continue nurture my own enthusiasm for exploring. Seeing. Tasting. And challenging myself. 





Kenmare. Ring of Kerry.

 Sneem. Ring of Kerry.

Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                      Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                Kasia Szymańska. Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

Bikes at the beach. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

Around Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Portmagee.

Kerry Cliffs, view from Valentia Island. 

                                                               On the way to Killarney.


 Killarney.



Written by Kasia Szymańska, veterinary student at UCD



Cycling the Ring of Kerry took less preparation than I had imagined. 180 kilometers seemed to be an unfathomably long bike ride that made my daily trips to school or Tesco pail in comparison. I had packed all the dates, bananas, and cashews that could fit inside my backpack to safeguard against what I feared was immanent starvation and exhaustion. Next, I was lent top-notch gear, including an ultra lightweight carbon fiber Trek bike, clip-in shoes, and shirts from a friend who is a real-life iron woman. (http://www.irishtriathlon.com/index.php/2014/07/tamara-maxantovas-kona-qualification-report-from-ironman-austria/) Then I found myself trolling on YouTube and stumbled along this gem on how to wear bike shorts (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hOcNoYchlI&feature=youtu.be). And so, Iza and I followed the wise words and went without knickers across 217.11 km of stunning scenery.

                                                             Gap of Danloe. Ring of Kerry.

Traveling is easy. And that’s something I should have reminded myself. There are always well-worn paths to follow and friendly locals to point you in the right direction. There are also always people who will stop to give you a lift. For instance, we sustained a bicycle injury (a broken chain) and despite the most heroic efforts to resuscitate it, we needed heavy-duty tools. And here entered a middle-aged English couple from the midlands who provided a lift to the nearest bike shop.

The challenging physical test I had hoped to meet ended up being pleasantly manageable. Perhaps the daily cycling and regular swimming, sport activities, and gym attendance helped? We easily covered around 70 kilometers each day, burning in total 5,641 calories each.

One of the most pleasant experiences of the trip was feeling that we were temporarily lifted out from Ireland. The weather was warm. The sun bronzed our skin (after burning mine first). We came across soft sand and beaches with turquoise water. Palm trees dotted the landscape along with colorful wildflowers that broke through the lush green. Magenta dangling bells, crimson and pink pendants, white fluffy saucers and yellow star-like petals that formed a wand. And of course, countryside hydrangeas of the most cheerful varieties.

Cycling from Killarney to Kenmare our first evening, we passed Ladies View and the National Forest as the summer sun was beginning to fall and a mist hovered among the rhododendrons that had just past their bloom. The goodnight song of the birds and fresh dewy forest air was revitalizing.


Day 1. Killerney-Kenmare.


Day 2. Kenmare - Ballinskellings.



Day 3. Ballinskellings-Glenbeigh.



Day 4. Glenbeigh-Killarney.


What would make cycling though the Ring of Kerry a 10 out of 10? Experiencing a well developed culinary tradition, bigger than a just your meal in a glass. We did have a pleasant dining experience at Rumours Café near Rossbeigh which served up muscles and lamb and Murphy’s salted ice cream in Killarney where we indulged in Dingle-gin and strawberry pleasures. But what about cycling though Champagne or Tuscany? This is all food for thought.

I will now travel by bike whenever possible, and hopefully, again with Iza. She makes for an incredible travel companion! Her tales of traveling across 7 continents kept me captivated and have inspired me to continue nurture my own enthusiasm for exploring. Seeing. Tasting. And challenging myself. 





Kenmare. Ring of Kerry.

 Sneem. Ring of Kerry.

Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                      Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                Kasia Szymańska. Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

Bikes at the beach. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

Around Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Portmagee.

Kerry Cliffs, view from Valentia Island. 

                                                               On the way to Killarney.


 Killarney.



Written by Kasia Szymańska, veterinary student at UCD

While traveling getting a GOOD cup of coffee is like winning a lotto. Iza was addicted to coffee. Almond croissant and a cup of coffee is what she often dreamed of while cruising around in the world. It was her daily pleasure prior to traveling. However, post traveling she has landed in the right spot in the wrong place. Coffee house! YES. Dublin? NO. The good and the bad explains her balance, and caffeine keeps her going. Few days ago, Iza and Caterina, Iza's roommate, colleague and BFF, played around at Chemex Coffee in Dublin.

Caffeine high.  

I am thirsty.



While traveling getting a GOOD cup of coffee is like winning a lotto. Iza was addicted to coffee. Almond croissant and a cup of coffee is what she often dreamed of while cruising around in the world. It was her daily pleasure prior to traveling. However, post traveling she has landed in the right spot in the wrong place. Coffee house! YES. Dublin? NO. The good and the bad explains her balance, and caffeine keeps her going. Few days ago, Iza and Caterina, Iza's roommate, colleague and BFF, played around at Chemex Coffee in Dublin.

Caffeine high.  

I am thirsty.



ITALY

ITALY

YEY,  we are featured in Tripoto, a travel site where you can discover, share travel stories and ideas. It was nice to reminisce and answer some of these questions. (Click on the image to read on)




YEY,  we are featured in Tripoto, a travel site where you can discover, share travel stories and ideas. It was nice to reminisce and answer some of these questions. (Click on the image to read on)




Yes! I made it in time to see the beauty of this past winters craze. In India I only seen FB posts of how much this winter sucked in NY, but I secretly admired and wanted to come. The winter is over it's a meltdown, the snow is dripping down, the ice is cracking and the fog is raising. 

I am alone in silence and the beauty of this snow-white is making me say — I've missed this place.

Here are few shots to bring you here with me.











Yes! I made it in time to see the beauty of this past winters craze. In India I only seen FB posts of how much this winter sucked in NY, but I secretly admired and wanted to come. The winter is over it's a meltdown, the snow is dripping down, the ice is cracking and the fog is raising. 

I am alone in silence and the beauty of this snow-white is making me say — I've missed this place.

Here are few shots to bring you here with me.













I am two hours away from landing in Budapest, and I am super excited. Six months in India can be life changing, but quite demanding. I am ready for a strong shot of civilization. What exactly does that mean? I want to stand online without someone cutting me off, I want to have fresh salad, I want to go running, I want to walk down the street in privacy, I want to take a hot shower, I want to drink water from the tap, I want my kitchen. I don’t want a bindi on my forehead,  I don’t want to bargain for food, I don’t want to wake up to the smell of burning plastic, I don’t want to hear dogs barking all night, I don’t want to hear Indians forcefully clearing their throat, I don’t want a mouse eating my food, and I certainly don’t want any more ants chewing on my panties.

- India, for now I must leave, but don’t worry in October I plan to come back.

There is something about this place that makes people return, including myself. I traveled to 38 countries, yet India is the one that I gravitate towards the most. This time was my third time and who knows how many more times I will return.

One of my friends, who’s never been to India, can not believe that I would even want to go there in the first place. - The poverty, the people, the smell, the food, the hygiene - he kept the negative list rolling out of all the things he picked up from TV and the net.

Yes, it’s hard to believe, but how can you believe if you’ve never been?

To enjoy India you have to give it a chance, minimum one month or more. If it’s only two weeks you will most likely hate it. If you give yourself a couple of weeks for the hectic to become the norm, only then the inner bliss of India will shine through.

I can’t answer my friend why I keep returning. Amongst all the craze I find peace, a peace which allows me to go deeper in and connect with my being. Somehow India provides a perfect environment to slow down and reconnect with the self. Time is not an issue, daily routines don’t really exist, and the facilities for yoga, meditation and other spiritual activities are simply incomparable to the western money making establishments. Ok, maybe they are not so clean, and not so fancy looking but that’s all part of it, to find peace and depth within, you don’t need to look out.

India has the roads to spiritual awakening. It’s where a new journey for me began, where I realized that I am not my thoughts, I am not my body and not a long list of things I thought I was.. It’s here where God became so clear to me, and now I believe. How can I hate this place? Why wouldn’t I want to come back?

During my second time visiting India, I was walking to Mooji’s satsangs and it became so clear to me why India rocks. A rickshaw driver was driving on the ghats near the river Ganges, mid aged women were doing laundry in the water, visitors were doing a puja in the soapy water, a dog was eating dead goats’ corpses on the banks of the river and little kids were insisting that I buy flowers, all happening in the same time and place. There were no rules, no fines, simply survival and daily chores. It was then that I realized that in India you can be free, there is only one rule, the rule of nature, and no one else is there to tell you how to walk, when to walk and how much you should pay to walk. It’s the subtle freedom in the “unfree” India that makes it one of a kind. But there are many more things that makes India awesome, you simply need to be open and try to see things from a different perspective. Coming from a society with strict rules, where the grass is green and the social order is automatic, one can very easily learn to hate India. This is why you need time.

Aside from spirituality, the colors, the festive mentality and the wobbling head gestures are a must see. India will break you, teach you, scalp you and then most likely fix you. Don’t be afraid, don’t listen to the media, use your instinct and experience it for yourself. It can only be magic if you believe. There will be hate, there will be love but it’s the perfect balance to it all.

As I write this, I recall my first post Holy Cow Wow, when I first arrived to India and wow, there is definitely a change.



I am two hours away from landing in Budapest, and I am super excited. Six months in India can be life changing, but quite demanding. I am ready for a strong shot of civilization. What exactly does that mean? I want to stand online without someone cutting me off, I want to have fresh salad, I want to go running, I want to walk down the street in privacy, I want to take a hot shower, I want to drink water from the tap, I want my kitchen. I don’t want a bindi on my forehead,  I don’t want to bargain for food, I don’t want to wake up to the smell of burning plastic, I don’t want to hear dogs barking all night, I don’t want to hear Indians forcefully clearing their throat, I don’t want a mouse eating my food, and I certainly don’t want any more ants chewing on my panties.

- India, for now I must leave, but don’t worry in October I plan to come back.

There is something about this place that makes people return, including myself. I traveled to 38 countries, yet India is the one that I gravitate towards the most. This time was my third time and who knows how many more times I will return.

One of my friends, who’s never been to India, can not believe that I would even want to go there in the first place. - The poverty, the people, the smell, the food, the hygiene - he kept the negative list rolling out of all the things he picked up from TV and the net.

Yes, it’s hard to believe, but how can you believe if you’ve never been?

To enjoy India you have to give it a chance, minimum one month or more. If it’s only two weeks you will most likely hate it. If you give yourself a couple of weeks for the hectic to become the norm, only then the inner bliss of India will shine through.

I can’t answer my friend why I keep returning. Amongst all the craze I find peace, a peace which allows me to go deeper in and connect with my being. Somehow India provides a perfect environment to slow down and reconnect with the self. Time is not an issue, daily routines don’t really exist, and the facilities for yoga, meditation and other spiritual activities are simply incomparable to the western money making establishments. Ok, maybe they are not so clean, and not so fancy looking but that’s all part of it, to find peace and depth within, you don’t need to look out.

India has the roads to spiritual awakening. It’s where a new journey for me began, where I realized that I am not my thoughts, I am not my body and not a long list of things I thought I was.. It’s here where God became so clear to me, and now I believe. How can I hate this place? Why wouldn’t I want to come back?

During my second time visiting India, I was walking to Mooji’s satsangs and it became so clear to me why India rocks. A rickshaw driver was driving on the ghats near the river Ganges, mid aged women were doing laundry in the water, visitors were doing a puja in the soapy water, a dog was eating dead goats’ corpses on the banks of the river and little kids were insisting that I buy flowers, all happening in the same time and place. There were no rules, no fines, simply survival and daily chores. It was then that I realized that in India you can be free, there is only one rule, the rule of nature, and no one else is there to tell you how to walk, when to walk and how much you should pay to walk. It’s the subtle freedom in the “unfree” India that makes it one of a kind. But there are many more things that makes India awesome, you simply need to be open and try to see things from a different perspective. Coming from a society with strict rules, where the grass is green and the social order is automatic, one can very easily learn to hate India. This is why you need time.

Aside from spirituality, the colors, the festive mentality and the wobbling head gestures are a must see. India will break you, teach you, scalp you and then most likely fix you. Don’t be afraid, don’t listen to the media, use your instinct and experience it for yourself. It can only be magic if you believe. There will be hate, there will be love but it’s the perfect balance to it all.

As I write this, I recall my first post Holy Cow Wow, when I first arrived to India and wow, there is definitely a change.