My journey keeps unfolding. In 2017, at 37 I will give birth to a little baby girl, Luna. Her due date is January 6th, 2017. As I prepare for this big day in every way, I find yoga to keeps me sane. It opens my body, my mind and allows me to bond. It mentally prepares me for the upcoming challenge and erases any fear. I can do this and I will.

Positive, Peaceful, Harmless 2017 journey for all.

VIEW VIDEO



My journey keeps unfolding. In 2017, at 37 I will give birth to a little baby girl, Luna. Her due date is January 6th, 2017. As I prepare for this big day in every way, I find yoga to keeps me sane. It opens my body, my mind and allows me to bond. It mentally prepares me for the upcoming challenge and erases any fear. I can do this and I will.

Positive, Peaceful, Harmless 2017 journey for all.

VIEW VIDEO


 BOOM FESTIVAL 2016 Photos

 BOOM FESTIVAL 2016 Photos

Photo Journey Portugal

Photo Journey Portugal


https://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=zFX6Yc1rlk8

https://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=zFX6Yc1rlk8


A while back I took a trip with one of my friends, who is a graffiti artist to Staten Island. This by far was one of the most secluded spots I have been to in a while. It's part of NYC that most people would never even think it existed. Staten Island who? or where? Yes it's one of NYC boroughs and it surely has many hidden urban treasures. Graffiti? Who does it anyway. Walk around Williamsburg or east of Williamsburg and you will definitely come across an art piece that most of us would call graffiti. But I have a slight different understanding what graffiti is.

I think there is a difference between graffiti and wall murals that we call graffiti. All the pieces that are shown on the images below say something different then the painted murals in Williamsburg or other parts of NYC like East Village. The intention and motives I feel are a bit different. I don't think the graffiti that I took pics of on Staten Island was commissioned, nor even allowed vs some of the murals with positive messages or PR. These artist who tag the walls simply say one thing. "I was here" Like a dog marking their territory! With style they recognize and give props to one another. My friend seems to notice all the tags in and around NYC. Things that I am totally oblivious to. But he know's, like a dog knows his kind, he knows.

Take a peek at what I would say is the real graffiti in NYC.


DSC00239.jpg

A while back I took a trip with one of my friends, who is a graffiti artist to Staten Island. This by far was one of the most secluded spots I have been to in a while. It's part of NYC that most people would never even think it existed. Staten Island who? or where? Yes it's one of NYC boroughs and it surely has many hidden urban treasures. Graffiti? Who does it anyway. Walk around Williamsburg or east of Williamsburg and you will definitely come across an art piece that most of us would call graffiti. But I have a slight different understanding what graffiti is.

I think there is a difference between graffiti and wall murals that we call graffiti. All the pieces that are shown on the images below say something different then the painted murals in Williamsburg or other parts of NYC like East Village. The intention and motives I feel are a bit different. I don't think the graffiti that I took pics of on Staten Island was commissioned, nor even allowed vs some of the murals with positive messages or PR. These artist who tag the walls simply say one thing. "I was here" Like a dog marking their territory! With style they recognize and give props to one another. My friend seems to notice all the tags in and around NYC. Things that I am totally oblivious to. But he know's, like a dog knows his kind, he knows.

Take a peek at what I would say is the real graffiti in NYC.


DSC00239.jpg

Way back when.. a bit of time passed since then,. BUT a classic time with classy people. When the trio bond (Take-it, E-zy, A-gain) unpredicted things were formed.

Featuring vocalist and piano Tatyana Shemberova,  silent guitarist Izabela Kobylarz and our couch-surfing host in Fes.

Filmed by Aga,
Edited by Tatyana Shemberova

Way back when.. a bit of time passed since then,. BUT a classic time with classy people. When the trio bond (Take-it, E-zy, A-gain) unpredicted things were formed.

Featuring vocalist and piano Tatyana Shemberova,  silent guitarist Izabela Kobylarz and our couch-surfing host in Fes.

Filmed by Aga,
Edited by Tatyana Shemberova



Cycling the Ring of Kerry took less preparation than I had imagined. 180 kilometers seemed to be an unfathomably long bike ride that made my daily trips to school or Tesco pail in comparison. I had packed all the dates, bananas, and cashews that could fit inside my backpack to safeguard against what I feared was immanent starvation and exhaustion. Next, I was lent top-notch gear, including an ultra lightweight carbon fiber Trek bike, clip-in shoes, and shirts from a friend who is a real-life iron woman. (http://www.irishtriathlon.com/index.php/2014/07/tamara-maxantovas-kona-qualification-report-from-ironman-austria/) Then I found myself trolling on YouTube and stumbled along this gem on how to wear bike shorts (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hOcNoYchlI&feature=youtu.be). And so, Iza and I followed the wise words and went without knickers across 217.11 km of stunning scenery.

                                                             Gap of Danloe. Ring of Kerry.

Traveling is easy. And that’s something I should have reminded myself. There are always well-worn paths to follow and friendly locals to point you in the right direction. There are also always people who will stop to give you a lift. For instance, we sustained a bicycle injury (a broken chain) and despite the most heroic efforts to resuscitate it, we needed heavy-duty tools. And here entered a middle-aged English couple from the midlands who provided a lift to the nearest bike shop.

The challenging physical test I had hoped to meet ended up being pleasantly manageable. Perhaps the daily cycling and regular swimming, sport activities, and gym attendance helped? We easily covered around 70 kilometers each day, burning in total 5,641 calories each.

One of the most pleasant experiences of the trip was feeling that we were temporarily lifted out from Ireland. The weather was warm. The sun bronzed our skin (after burning mine first). We came across soft sand and beaches with turquoise water. Palm trees dotted the landscape along with colorful wildflowers that broke through the lush green. Magenta dangling bells, crimson and pink pendants, white fluffy saucers and yellow star-like petals that formed a wand. And of course, countryside hydrangeas of the most cheerful varieties.

Cycling from Killarney to Kenmare our first evening, we passed Ladies View and the National Forest as the summer sun was beginning to fall and a mist hovered among the rhododendrons that had just past their bloom. The goodnight song of the birds and fresh dewy forest air was revitalizing.


Day 1. Killerney-Kenmare.


Day 2. Kenmare - Ballinskellings.



Day 3. Ballinskellings-Glenbeigh.



Day 4. Glenbeigh-Killarney.


What would make cycling though the Ring of Kerry a 10 out of 10? Experiencing a well developed culinary tradition, bigger than a just your meal in a glass. We did have a pleasant dining experience at Rumours Café near Rossbeigh which served up muscles and lamb and Murphy’s salted ice cream in Killarney where we indulged in Dingle-gin and strawberry pleasures. But what about cycling though Champagne or Tuscany? This is all food for thought.

I will now travel by bike whenever possible, and hopefully, again with Iza. She makes for an incredible travel companion! Her tales of traveling across 7 continents kept me captivated and have inspired me to continue nurture my own enthusiasm for exploring. Seeing. Tasting. And challenging myself. 





Kenmare. Ring of Kerry.

 Sneem. Ring of Kerry.

Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                      Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                Kasia Szymańska. Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

Bikes at the beach. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

Around Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Portmagee.

Kerry Cliffs, view from Valentia Island. 

                                                               On the way to Killarney.


 Killarney.



Written by Kasia Szymańska, veterinary student at UCD



Cycling the Ring of Kerry took less preparation than I had imagined. 180 kilometers seemed to be an unfathomably long bike ride that made my daily trips to school or Tesco pail in comparison. I had packed all the dates, bananas, and cashews that could fit inside my backpack to safeguard against what I feared was immanent starvation and exhaustion. Next, I was lent top-notch gear, including an ultra lightweight carbon fiber Trek bike, clip-in shoes, and shirts from a friend who is a real-life iron woman. (http://www.irishtriathlon.com/index.php/2014/07/tamara-maxantovas-kona-qualification-report-from-ironman-austria/) Then I found myself trolling on YouTube and stumbled along this gem on how to wear bike shorts (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hOcNoYchlI&feature=youtu.be). And so, Iza and I followed the wise words and went without knickers across 217.11 km of stunning scenery.

                                                             Gap of Danloe. Ring of Kerry.

Traveling is easy. And that’s something I should have reminded myself. There are always well-worn paths to follow and friendly locals to point you in the right direction. There are also always people who will stop to give you a lift. For instance, we sustained a bicycle injury (a broken chain) and despite the most heroic efforts to resuscitate it, we needed heavy-duty tools. And here entered a middle-aged English couple from the midlands who provided a lift to the nearest bike shop.

The challenging physical test I had hoped to meet ended up being pleasantly manageable. Perhaps the daily cycling and regular swimming, sport activities, and gym attendance helped? We easily covered around 70 kilometers each day, burning in total 5,641 calories each.

One of the most pleasant experiences of the trip was feeling that we were temporarily lifted out from Ireland. The weather was warm. The sun bronzed our skin (after burning mine first). We came across soft sand and beaches with turquoise water. Palm trees dotted the landscape along with colorful wildflowers that broke through the lush green. Magenta dangling bells, crimson and pink pendants, white fluffy saucers and yellow star-like petals that formed a wand. And of course, countryside hydrangeas of the most cheerful varieties.

Cycling from Killarney to Kenmare our first evening, we passed Ladies View and the National Forest as the summer sun was beginning to fall and a mist hovered among the rhododendrons that had just past their bloom. The goodnight song of the birds and fresh dewy forest air was revitalizing.


Day 1. Killerney-Kenmare.


Day 2. Kenmare - Ballinskellings.



Day 3. Ballinskellings-Glenbeigh.



Day 4. Glenbeigh-Killarney.


What would make cycling though the Ring of Kerry a 10 out of 10? Experiencing a well developed culinary tradition, bigger than a just your meal in a glass. We did have a pleasant dining experience at Rumours Café near Rossbeigh which served up muscles and lamb and Murphy’s salted ice cream in Killarney where we indulged in Dingle-gin and strawberry pleasures. But what about cycling though Champagne or Tuscany? This is all food for thought.

I will now travel by bike whenever possible, and hopefully, again with Iza. She makes for an incredible travel companion! Her tales of traveling across 7 continents kept me captivated and have inspired me to continue nurture my own enthusiasm for exploring. Seeing. Tasting. And challenging myself. 





Kenmare. Ring of Kerry.

 Sneem. Ring of Kerry.

Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                      Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

                                                Kasia Szymańska. Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.


 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

 Derrynane/Caherdaniel. Ring of Kerry.

Bikes at the beach. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 Around Derrynane. Ring of Kerry.

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

 On the way to Waterville. Ring of Kerry. 

Around Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Ballinskelligs. Skellig Ring.

Portmagee.

Kerry Cliffs, view from Valentia Island. 

                                                               On the way to Killarney.


 Killarney.



Written by Kasia Szymańska, veterinary student at UCD

While traveling getting a GOOD cup of coffee is like winning a lotto. Iza was addicted to coffee. Almond croissant and a cup of coffee is what she often dreamed of while cruising around in the world. It was her daily pleasure prior to traveling. However, post traveling she has landed in the right spot in the wrong place. Coffee house! YES. Dublin? NO. The good and the bad explains her balance, and caffeine keeps her going. Few days ago, Iza and Caterina, Iza's roommate, colleague and BFF, played around at Chemex Coffee in Dublin.

Caffeine high.  

I am thirsty.



While traveling getting a GOOD cup of coffee is like winning a lotto. Iza was addicted to coffee. Almond croissant and a cup of coffee is what she often dreamed of while cruising around in the world. It was her daily pleasure prior to traveling. However, post traveling she has landed in the right spot in the wrong place. Coffee house! YES. Dublin? NO. The good and the bad explains her balance, and caffeine keeps her going. Few days ago, Iza and Caterina, Iza's roommate, colleague and BFF, played around at Chemex Coffee in Dublin.

Caffeine high.  

I am thirsty.



ITALY

ITALY

YEY,  we are featured in Tripoto, a travel site where you can discover, share travel stories and ideas. It was nice to reminisce and answer some of these questions. (Click on the image to read on)




YEY,  we are featured in Tripoto, a travel site where you can discover, share travel stories and ideas. It was nice to reminisce and answer some of these questions. (Click on the image to read on)




Yes! I made it in time to see the beauty of this past winters craze. In India I only seen FB posts of how much this winter sucked in NY, but I secretly admired and wanted to come. The winter is over it's a meltdown, the snow is dripping down, the ice is cracking and the fog is raising. 

I am alone in silence and the beauty of this snow-white is making me say — I've missed this place.

Here are few shots to bring you here with me.











Yes! I made it in time to see the beauty of this past winters craze. In India I only seen FB posts of how much this winter sucked in NY, but I secretly admired and wanted to come. The winter is over it's a meltdown, the snow is dripping down, the ice is cracking and the fog is raising. 

I am alone in silence and the beauty of this snow-white is making me say — I've missed this place.

Here are few shots to bring you here with me.